¡ SAMPLE OF ME !

A blog by artist Larry Achiampong.
Larry is a London-based artist. He graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art in 2008 with an MA in Sculpture and has since exhibited and performed in various spaces within the UK and abroad including Tate Britain; London, Iniva; London, ICA; London, Yinka Shonibare’s Guest Project Space; London, Five Years; London, Battersea Arts Center; London, Novas Contemporary Urban Center; Liverpool, Westergasfabriek; Amsterdam, Ausland; Berlin and Antje oeklesund; Berlin.

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If you never made it Friday, you missed out. Respect to Zezi for curating a strong event.

A bit of audible goodness to finish the year off. Shout out to David Blandy for the vocal on the 1st track: Cloud by Black Ph03nix (Larry Achiampong)

Collaging in Hastings….

aadatart:

British-Ghanaian Larry Achiampong: Cloud at London’s Tate Modern (Race, Diversity, Identity)

By Vanessa Peterson

Cloud, performed by British-Ghanaian visual artist Larry Achiampong investigates the concept of racial identity while exploring the consequences of ‘othering’ in modern British society. The performance, at London’s Tate Modern begins with the Cloudface character – a mask with a black head and bright red lips – entering the gallery escorted by an anonymous female character towards a space containing paintings and sculptures by Picasso. On arrival, the Cloudface character sits silently in a chair placed against the bare white walls of the gallery for an hour, and again is escorted out of the gallery space by the same anonymous female character. This performance is a continuation of Achiampong’s photo series, ‘Lemme Skull U’ and ‘Glyth’ where he places the Cloudface character on top of photographs of family members in a variety of situations via digital manipulation, erasing them of their identities. Essentially making them faceless with no back-story.

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If you’re in London (this Saturday, 16th Nov) you should come. Gonna be LARGE…

ITS BIGGER THAN HIP, ART, HIP, ART, HIP, ART, HIP…

studioafrica:

Larry Achiampong’s Glyth Series

DS: Cloudface brings to mind the golliwog and blackface. Is it your intention to evoke those allusions? Why impose that racist history on such personal images?  
LA: The cloudface was partially inspired by the experience of seeing the Robertson’s Golly mascot on marmalade jars as a child during breakfast and other family meals. In my youth, I always associated the Golly with what an alien might be. When designing cloudface I did further research on the Robertson’s Golly character and found out that it was only discontinued in 2001, the company apparently retired the character not because of it’s racist connotations, but that the company wanted to ‘move with the times.’ My inspiration for cloudface also comes from comics and anime; ‘V’ (from Alan Moore‘s ‘V for Vendetta’) in particular his Guy Fawkes mask (made famous through the Occupy Movement) and also Laughing Man from the Ghost in The Shell Series. By mixing these various elements I want to have a lasting relevant conversation about prejudice in it’s many guises. Just because images of Golliwogs and Blackface are not paraded in the way that they were in the past, it doesn’t mean the world has thrown that type of mentality to the dust. I think in the UK we are quite guilty of easily sweeping moments like these under the carpet in the hope that no one will unearth them. Stare at a clown long enough and the jokes begin to disappear. I work with images that include my family as a starting point for telling a story that will open up and become less about the singular moment and more about plural debates.

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knowledgeisqueen:

i love this because it forces the viewer to consider the real people racist imagery supposedly represents. this series is a conversation starter on so many levels, especially since this halloween season seems to be plagued by black face and other racist costumes. i really appreciate his work and i look forward to seeing more from larry achiampong!

-trae. 

studioafrica:

Larry Achiampong’s Glyth Series

DS: Cloudface brings to mind the golliwog and blackface. Is it your intention to evoke those allusions? Why impose that racist history on such personal images?  
LA: The cloudface was partially inspired by the experience of seeing the Robertson’s Golly mascot on marmalade jars as a child during breakfast and other family meals. In my youth, I always associated the Golly with what an alien might be. When designing cloudface I did further research on the Robertson’s Golly character and found out that it was only discontinued in 2001, the company apparently retired the character not because of it’s racist connotations, but that the company wanted to ‘move with the times.’ My inspiration for cloudface also comes from comics and anime; ‘V’ (from Alan Moore‘s ‘V for Vendetta’) in particular his Guy Fawkes mask (made famous through the Occupy Movement) and also Laughing Man from the Ghost in The Shell Series. By mixing these various elements I want to have a lasting relevant conversation about prejudice in it’s many guises. Just because images of Golliwogs and Blackface are not paraded in the way that they were in the past, it doesn’t mean the world has thrown that type of mentality to the dust. I think in the UK we are quite guilty of easily sweeping moments like these under the carpet in the hope that no one will unearth them. Stare at a clown long enough and the jokes begin to disappear. I work with images that include my family as a starting point for telling a story that will open up and become less about the singular moment and more about plural debates.

MORE

knowledgeisqueen:

i love this because it forces the viewer to consider the real people racist imagery supposedly represents. this series is a conversation starter on so many levels, especially since this halloween season seems to be plagued by black face and other racist costumes. i really appreciate his work and i look forward to seeing more from larry achiampong!

-trae. 

studioafrica:

Larry Achiampong’s Glyth Series

DS: Cloudface brings to mind the golliwog and blackface. Is it your intention to evoke those allusions? Why impose that racist history on such personal images?  
LA: The cloudface was partially inspired by the experience of seeing the Robertson’s Golly mascot on marmalade jars as a child during breakfast and other family meals. In my youth, I always associated the Golly with what an alien might be. When designing cloudface I did further research on the Robertson’s Golly character and found out that it was only discontinued in 2001, the company apparently retired the character not because of it’s racist connotations, but that the company wanted to ‘move with the times.’ My inspiration for cloudface also comes from comics and anime; ‘V’ (from Alan Moore‘s ‘V for Vendetta’) in particular his Guy Fawkes mask (made famous through the Occupy Movement) and also Laughing Man from the Ghost in The Shell Series. By mixing these various elements I want to have a lasting relevant conversation about prejudice in it’s many guises. Just because images of Golliwogs and Blackface are not paraded in the way that they were in the past, it doesn’t mean the world has thrown that type of mentality to the dust. I think in the UK we are quite guilty of easily sweeping moments like these under the carpet in the hope that no one will unearth them. Stare at a clown long enough and the jokes begin to disappear. I work with images that include my family as a starting point for telling a story that will open up and become less about the singular moment and more about plural debates.

MORE

studioafrica:

Larry Achiampong’s Glyth Series

DS: Cloudface brings to mind the golliwog and blackface. Is it your intention to evoke those allusions? Why impose that racist history on such personal images?  
LA: The cloudface was partially inspired by the experience of seeing the Robertson’s Golly mascot on marmalade jars as a child during breakfast and other family meals. In my youth, I always associated the Golly with what an alien might be. When designing cloudface I did further research on the Robertson’s Golly character and found out that it was only discontinued in 2001, the company apparently retired the character not because of it’s racist connotations, but that the company wanted to ‘move with the times.’ My inspiration for cloudface also comes from comics and anime; ‘V’ (from Alan Moore‘s ‘V for Vendetta’) in particular his Guy Fawkes mask (made famous through the Occupy Movement) and also Laughing Man from the Ghost in The Shell Series. By mixing these various elements I want to have a lasting relevant conversation about prejudice in it’s many guises. Just because images of Golliwogs and Blackface are not paraded in the way that they were in the past, it doesn’t mean the world has thrown that type of mentality to the dust. I think in the UK we are quite guilty of easily sweeping moments like these under the carpet in the hope that no one will unearth them. Stare at a clown long enough and the jokes begin to disappear. I work with images that include my family as a starting point for telling a story that will open up and become less about the singular moment and more about plural debates.

MORE

thelostlanguageofplants:

Rubus sp. 2013, 22 cm x 30 cm Collage 

I killed Trayvon Martin 

Cloud - Larry Achiampong 

Instead of saying “I am Trayvon Martin” it would do more good for white people [and non-Black people] in solidarity with the Trayvon Martin case to recognize all the ways they are Zimmerman.

As in, if you live in a “safe” suburban or gated community that is mostly white and that is considered a “good” neighborhood because it excludes people of colour [especially excluding Black people] then you benefit from the same conditions that created Zimmerman.

If you benefit from “police protection” to your property that depends on racial profiling of people of colour [especially Black people] and brutality towards them then you take part in the same systems that create Zimmerman.

If you have the racial privilege to work, move, live in mostly white spaces and have limited contact with… [Black people], particularly “low income” …[Black people], then you live with the same social and economic policies of casual segregation that create Zimmerman.

It’s good that people recognize the injustice of Trayvon Martin’s death, but if that recognition is not accompanied by the work to recognize and undo the systematic economic, social, educational and employment policies that create neighborhoods where Black people are seen as threatening trespassers - and how people benefit from this racial privilege - then no true anti-racist work can occur.

Nobody wants to say “I am Zimmerman” but until we recognize how Zimmerman reflects institutionalized racism there will continue to be more Trayvons.

El Jones (via writeswrongs)

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